Porn Blackmail

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Category: Badware News

Porn Blackmail is not a direct computer infection. It is a scam that tries to push scared users into clicking a link they receive in a spam email. If you receive this message, it doesn’t mean that your computer has been infected with anything. Although it would be a good idea to scan your system with a reliable antispyware scanner to make sure that everything is okay. To put it simply, you do not need to remove Porn Blackmail because it is not on your computer. All you have to do is delete the email that carries it and be done with it.

If users are aware of various spam campaigns that could be used for extortion, they are obviously less willing to fall for these tricks. It is easy to see when you encounter a spam email because it is very often that the message in the email is generic and formulaic. Sometimes terrible grammar and sentence structure is a dead give away that you are dealing with the fake. However, what makes Porn Blackmail so different, and why could users fall for this trick?

First, here’s the main message carried by Porn Blackmail:

I actually placed a malware on the porn website and guess what, you visited this web site to have fun (you know what I mean). While you were watching the video, your web browser acted as a RDP (Remote Desktop) and a keylogger which provided me access to your display screen and webcam. Right after that, my software gathered all your contacts from your Messenger, Facebook account, and email account.

The message goes on to say that these criminals have recorded you watching porn through your webcam, and if you don’t that video to spread around the web, you need to pay $1400 in Bitcoin as soon as possible. This is where most of the users would close the email and delete it immediately. So, what stops others from doing so? That’s actually the first line that comes with this email. At the top of the message, you will see the following:

I’m aware that <password> is your password.

The password displayed in the message will be one of the many passwords you have used for your email account before, and it will be an old one. So, it is clear that the scammers behind this spam campaign do not have the latest information. However, they do get their hands on some old leaked data, and if users recognize their old passwords, they might be more inclined to believe that this scam is the real deal.

However, you should never pay a single cent to these crooks. Simply delete the extortion email and rest assured: These scammers do not have your messenger or your Facebook details. They only say so the make the message scarier.

To avoid things like Porn Blackmail in the future, you need to review your cybersecurity habits. You should never share personal photos and images with unknown people because you can never know where it could be used. Also, refrain from downloading attachments that you receive from unknown senders. If you must, scan the attached file with a security tool of your choice before opening it.

Finally, if you are nervous about being monitored through your webcam, you can always turn the webcam off or even stick a sticky note to it, making sure it cannot film anything. However, all in all, it should be possible to avoid the likes of Porn Blackmail if you follow the usual cybersecurity guidelines. Always think twice and do not act rashly even if situation seems extreme. There is always a way out.

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